15 August, 2007

Respect the distance

I'm in training for my 5th marathon right now. Having done 4 already, I know the training, I know the gear, the nutrition, the need for BodyGlide, good socks, GUs/sport beans/Clif Bloks, etc.

But this is the first of my marathons where I've kept up decent mileage in the off-season. This is the first of my marathons where I'm physically fit enough to realistically and logically train for a marathon. This is the first of my marathons where I'm actually running most of my scheduled runs.

So why am I so nervous?

I figured out that I'm scared of what it means for me on race day. It means that I'm actually going to have to "bring it" mentally and that I'm going to have to push through my fatigue because I've trained to do so. In years past, if I was tired, I dropped to a walk and stayed there because it was comfortable and because I knew my half-assed training hadn't prepared me to go the full 26.2 running so why even try to make it past 20 running - hey, as long as I made it across the finish line, that was ok.

Now, I'm really training and that means no excuses on race day. Damn, that's scary.

4 comments:

Tom said...

First of all, congrats you're having a good training experience. Me too, and I just posted about that yesterday.

I've "showed up" for marathons where I had to wonder about both my training and then the whole-race day matter of executing the race well. It's a helluva lot better to be trained and only have to worry about running wise and executing your race plan.

Chicago is the place to run well and fast. Incredible crowd support and pace teams that will get you to the finish within 60 sec of your goal time.

You're in an enviable place with your great training! Keep up the great work!

You already respect the distance, and you'll pull off a quality 26.2 in Chicago!

SuperMelRunning said...

This comment of "It means that I'm actually going to have to "bring it" mentally and that I'm going to have to push through my fatigue because I've trained to do so." really hit home for me. In all my other marathons there is a point where I just shut down and don't push through the fatigue and at columbus I need to push those thoughts aside and live up to what am I capable of.

I think what is really taking place is that I am afraid of reaching my goals because I'm not worth having those feelings on what it's like to reach goals made. I need to realize I am capable of realizing my goals. I know you will be able to too. I can't wait to follow your progress on race day and in your realization of all of your potential viturually. You rock!

RunJulieRun said...

I think you hit it on the head here!

I just wanted to finish my first marathon. I talked myself into walking--it was okay--it's a long way. This time I will need to "bring it".

You will do well! Game on, Sister!

Kent said...

I am there with you. I am doing my first, and I don't want to be the guy who walks the final 13.1 miles. This makes my training - I actually ran the 18 miles long run last week with the commitment to see what I could do rather than just complete it. I am not sure which is worse - not knowing the coming pain and preparing for it or knowing it all too well and prepping for it again. Thanks for the post.